Oncology & Cancer

Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. They developed a system that allows them to select where and when CAR T cells ...

Immunology

A new regulator of B cell development

Interleukin-33 (IL-33) drives inflammatory responses in allergic and nonallergic disease. Epithelial cells in the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and elsewhere release IL-33, which activates the ST2 receptor on immune cell ...

Cardiology

Research uncovers new sex-specific factor in CV disease

A common receptor may serve differentiated roles related to aging-associated cardiovascular disease (CV) in males and females. Jennifer DuPont, Ph.D., will present the findings of this first-of-its-kind study today at the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientist designs 'express courier service' for immune cells

Immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to fight cancer. It can be used as a primary treatment or in combination with other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy to ...

Neuroscience

Team discovers one more piece to the autism puzzle

Mutations in a subunit of a receptor that binds the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABAA in the brain have been linked, through a common mechanism, to epilepsy, autism and intellectual disability, researchers at Vanderbilt ...

Oncology & Cancer

A new route to blocking children's bone cancer

Ewing sarcoma is a bone cancer that appears mainly in teenagers. Due to a single defective gene, once it spreads to distant organs it is hard to treat. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have discovered molecular ...

Oncology & Cancer

Neurons promote growth of brain tumor cells

In a current paper published in the journal Nature, Heidelberg-based researchers and physicians describe how neurons in the brain establish contact with aggressive glioblastomas and thus promote tumor growth / New tumor activation ...

Neuroscience

Researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste

Sour is the taste of summer, a taste that evokes lemonade stands and vine-ripe tomatoes. Among the five basic tastes—the others being bitter, sweet, salty and umami—it is arguably the most subtle. In small amounts, it ...

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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