Psychology & Psychiatry

No pain, no gain? How the brain chooses between pain and profit

Imagine having to choose over and over between what you enjoy doing and the pain that it might cause you, whether physical or emotional. If you live with conditions such as depression, anxiety, or chronic pain, you are probably ...

Health

Emotional patterns a factor in children's food choices

The emotional context in which eating occurs has been thought to influence eating patterns and diet, with studies finding negative emotions predict excessive calorie intake and poor diet quality. A research article featured ...

Health

Can food taxes and subsidies improve health outcomes?

Globally, millions of deaths every year can be attributed to bad diets, and these numbers are rising. These deaths are preventable, and one strategy to encourage consumers to make healthier choices is through fiscal policy, ...

Genetics

Do our genes determine what we eat?

Preliminary findings from a new study involving more than 6,000 adults found that taste-related genes may play a role in determining food choices and could, in turn, influence cardiometabolic health. It is one of the first ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Mayo Clinic Q and A: 4 ways to reduce your risk of dementia

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am in my mid-40s and have two young children. My mother developed memory issues in her early 60s, and it has progressively worsened. Her sisters also have related issues. How can I reduce my risk—and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How to talk to your employer about trauma

The impact of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a hidden chronic mental health issue in the workplace. A 2016 survey of U.K. adults found that one in five people between the ages of 18 and 74 said they had ...

page 1 from 40

Choice

Choice consists of the mental process of judging the merits of multiple options and selecting one of them. While a choice can be made between imagined options ("what would I do if ...?"), often a choice is made between real options, and followed by the corresponding action. For example, a route for a journey is chosen based on the preference of arriving at a given destination as soon as possible. The preferred (and therefore chosen) route is then derived from information about how long each of the possible routes take. This can be done by a route planner. If the preference is more complex, such as involving the scenery of the route, cognition and feeling are more intertwined, and the choice is less easy to delegate to a computer program or assistant.

More complex examples (often decisions that affect what a person thinks or their core beliefs) include choosing a lifestyle, religious affiliation, or political position.

Most people regard having choices as a good thing, though a severely limited or artificially restricted choice can lead to discomfort with choosing and possibly, an unsatisfactory outcome. In contrast, unlimited choice may lead to confusion, regret of the alternatives not taken, and indifference in an unstructured existence; and the illusion that choosing an object or a course leads necessarily to control of that object or course can cause psychological problems.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA