Arthritis & Rheumatism

Osteoarthritis assessment to go hi-tech

Scientists have reported an advanced imaging technique that allows the condition of joint cartilage to be examined—right down to the molecular level. The technique has potential for diagnostics and treatment-planning of ...

Medical research

New mechanism of bone growth discovered

In a paper published in the journal Nature, an international research team led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden reports that bone growth in mice takes place in accordance with the same principles as when ...

Medical research

The art of building bone

Cell differentiation is a widely studied phenomenon forming the basis of all developmental processes including fetal growth and bone fracture healing. A series of recent studies indicates the emerging role of chondrocyte-to-osteoblast ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Personalized diagnostic assay for the treatment of knee injuries

An article published in Experimental Biology and Medicine (Volume 242, Issue 18, December 2017) describes a new approach for profiling patients with joint injuries. The study, led by Dr. Ursula Anderer, Professor for Cell ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

New technique for repairing knee cartilage damage

Dear Mayo Clinic: I'm interested in the new procedure approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can repair cartilage in the knee. How does it work? Who's a good candidate for this procedure?

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Chemical stimuli can support growing of stable cartilage cells

Cell-based therapies could offer a way to treat cartilage injuries before the ultimate damage of osteoarthritis on articular cartilage. Cartilage-derived chondrocytes can be used for cartilage repair, but the expanded cells ...

Medical research

Scaffold-free iPS cell-based hyaline cartilage for joint repair

Cranky knees and other joint pains are normal in the elderly and sometimes even in the young. While these pains are rarely life threatening, those who have them know the burden and effect on quality of life. In many cases, ...

Medical research

How cartilage cells sense forceful injury

We live with the same cartilage—the tissue that connects our joints—for a lifetime. And since we can't readily make new cartilage cells, we had better figure out how to keep what we have healthy.

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