Neuroscience

Longer siesta on bright days

Increasing sunlight intensity extends the sleep duration and results in a longer midday siesta which delays the resumption of activity to the evening. What sounds like an analysis of the effects of the unusually hot summer ...

Health

Sex differences in 'body clock' may benefit women's heart health

Research suggests that a gene that governs the body's biological (circadian) clock acts differently in males versus females and may protect females from heart disease. The study is the first to analyze circadian blood pressure ...

Health

Extended napping could cause cognitive decline in older people

Regular naps may be one of the privileges of retirement but research is pointing to napping as a contributor to cognitive decline. Scientists are now testing the idea that older people should instead meditate or learn a language ...

Health

How many calories do you burn? It depends on time of day

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 8 have made the surprising discovery that the number of calories people burn while at rest changes with the time of day. When at rest, people burn 10 percent more calories ...

Medical research

Body clock researchers prevent liver cancer growth in mice

The body's internal clock could play a critical role in the fight against certain types of liver cancer, according to a preclinical study by scientists from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). ...

page 1 from 21

Circadian rhythm

A circadian rhythm is a roughly-24-hour cycle in the biochemical, physiological or behavioral processes of living entities, including plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria (see bacterial circadian rhythms). The term "circadian", coined by Franz Halberg, comes from the Latin circa, "around," and diem or dies, "day", meaning literally "approximately one day." The formal study of biological temporal rhythms such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology.

Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated, and can be entrained by external cues, called Zeitgebers, the primary one of which is daylight. These rhythms allow organisms to anticipate and prepare for precise and regular environmental changes.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA