Genetics

Clock gene may connect mood and sleep

If you pull an all-nighter or stay up late to binge watch Game of Thrones, you will probably be grumpy the next day. But if you don't get enough sleep for weeks or months on end, you may develop depression or other lasting ...

Medical research

Circadian clock misalignment and consequences

(Medical Xpress)—Shift work sleep disorder comprises a group of symptoms including insomnia, proneness to accidents and inattentiveness that typically afflict people whose work schedules shift between day and night, disrupting ...

Neuroscience

New reset button discovered for circadian clock

The discovery of a new reset button for the brain's master biological clock could eventually lead to new treatments for conditions like seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift ...

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Clock

A clock is an instrument used to indicate, keep, and co-ordinate time. The word clock is derived ultimately (via Dutch, Northern French, and Medieval Latin) from the Celtic words clagan and clocca meaning "bell". A silent instrument missing such a mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece. In general usage today a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.

The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to consistently measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units: the day; the lunar month; and the year. Devices operating on several different physical processes have been used over the millennia, culminating in the clocks of today.

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