Psychology & Psychiatry

Smartphone app tackles mental health and issues of data consent

The MINDtick app was developed in South Australia by Flinders University and mental health technology developer goAct to assist with the early and accurate diagnosis and management of mental illness by allowing access to ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Fee for service psychology no answer to mental health

The Better Access Program, a scheme providing Medicare access to psychology services, has fundamental failures, according to research from The Australian National University (ANU).

Neuroscience

Hearing hate speech primes your brain for hateful actions

A mark on a page, an online meme, a fleeting sound. How can these seemingly insignificant stimuli lead to acts as momentous as participation in a racist rally or the massacre of innocent worshippers? Psychologists, neuroscientists, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

When it comes to our brains, there's no such thing as normal

There's nothing wrong with being a little weird. Because we think of psychological disorders on a continuum, we may worry when our own ways of thinking and behaving don't match up with our idealized notion of health. But ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

There are also drawbacks to being bilingual

The ability to speak more than one language certainly has its perks. It enables you to work in another country, for example, interact with people while travelling, or consume foreign media.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Online program to combat OCD

Adolescents will be able to use the internet to treat their Obsessive Compulsive Disorder thanks to a free initiative being run by The University of Queensland.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How stress aids memory

Retrieving memory content under stress does not work very well. However, stress can be helpful when it comes to saving new information—especially those that are emotionally relevant in stressful situations. At the Ruhr-Universitat ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Chronic pain relief more likely when psychological science involved

When it comes to chronic pain, psychological interventions often provide more relief than prescription drugs or surgery without the risk of side effects, but are used much less frequently than traditional medical treatments, ...

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