Medications

Researchers discover treatment that suppresses liver cancer

Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered a treatment combination that significantly reduces tumor growth and extends the life span of mice with liver cancer. This discovery provides a ...

Oncology & Cancer

Promising new pancreatic cancer treatment moves forward

Even among cancers, pancreatic cancer is an especially sinister form of disease. The one-year survival rate is extremely low, and treatment progress has lagged behind that of many other malignancies.

HIV & AIDS

Progress toward HIV cure highlighted

A comprehensive collection of articles describing the broad scope and current status of this global effort is published in a special issue of AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

HIV & AIDS

HIV patients ‘aging before their time’

While combination antiretroviral therapy has meant that people with HIV can live longer lives, research shows that the virus makes fundamental changes to the immune system by increasing the risk of developing age-related ...

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Combination therapy

In contemporary usage, the expression combination therapy most often refers to the simultaneous administration of two or more medications to treat a single disease, but the expression is also used when other types of therapy are used at the same time.

Conditions treated with combination therapy include tuberculosis, leprosy, cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Combination therapy may seem costlier than monotherapy in the short term but causes significant savings: lower treatment failure rate, lower case-fatality ratios, slower development of resistance and consequently, less money needed for the development of new drugs.

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