Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain tissue inflammation is key to Alzheimer's disease progression

Neuroinflammation is the key driver of the spread of pathologically misfolded proteins in the brain and causes cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School ...

Oncology & Cancer

Drug combination gets advanced liver cancer patients to surgery

A combination of the kinase-inhibitor drug cabozantinib and the immunotherapy drug nivolumab can make curative surgery possible in some liver cancer patients who would normally not be considered surgery candidates.

Oncology & Cancer

Smart combination therapy for liver cancer tackles drug resistance

Liver cancer is one of the most common cancer types worldwide and is especially common in China. A collaborative effort between researchers at the Netherlands Cancer Institute and Shanghai using CRISPR/Cas has led to the ...

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Combination therapy

In contemporary usage, the expression combination therapy most often refers to the simultaneous administration of two or more medications to treat a single disease, but the expression is also used when other types of therapy are used at the same time.

Conditions treated with combination therapy include tuberculosis, leprosy, cancer, malaria, and HIV/AIDS.

Combination therapy may seem costlier than monotherapy in the short term but causes significant savings: lower treatment failure rate, lower case-fatality ratios, slower development of resistance and consequently, less money needed for the development of new drugs.

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