Oncology & Cancer

How immune cells in the tumor microenvironment make things worse

Cells from the immune system called CD4+ regulatory T cells, or simply Treg, are linked to tumor prognosis: the more Treg cells present in a tumor, the worst the prognosis. We know from previous research studies that Treg ...

Oncology & Cancer

A stealthy way to combat tumors

Under the right circumstances, the body's T cells can detect and destroy cancer cells. However, in most cancer patients, T cells become disarmed once they enter the environment surrounding a tumor. 

Oncology & Cancer

Young adult cancer patients may need different treatment options

Not all tumors are alike. Young adults who are diagnosed with skin, colon, and other cancer types may require different treatments than older patients receive. That is the primary conclusion of a Mount Sinai study which systematically ...

Immunology

Bone marrow backup needed to tackle respiratory infections

Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have found how the immune system triggers an 'emergency' dendritic cell response during infection, with dendritic cells at the site of infection being reinforced by new cells which ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How COVID-19 alters the immune system

COVID-19 reduces the numbers and functional competence of certain types of immune cells in the blood, say LMU researchers. This could affect responses to secondary infections.

Oncology & Cancer

New cancer treatment may reawaken the immune system

Immunotherapy is a promising strategy to treat cancer by stimulating the body's own immune system to destroy tumor cells, but it only works for a handful of cancers. MIT researchers have now discovered a new way to jump-start ...

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Dendrite

Dendrites (from Greek δένδρον déndron, “tree”) are the branched projections of a neuron that act to conduct the electrochemical stimulation received from other neural cells to the cell body, or soma, of the neuron from which the dendrites project. Electrical stimulation is transmitted onto dendrites by upstream neurons via synapses which are located at various points throughout the dendritic arbor. Dendrites play a critical role in integrating these synaptic inputs and in determining the extent to which action potentials are produced by the neuron. Recent research has also found that dendrites can support action potentials and release neurotransmitters, a property that was originally believed to be specific to axons.

The long outgrowths on immune system dendritic cells are also called dendrites. These dendrites do not process electrical signals.

Certain classes of dendrites (i.e. Purkinje cells of cerebellum, cerebral cortex) contain small projections referred to as "appendages" or "spines". Appendages increase receptive properties of dendrites to isolate signal specificity. Increased neural activity at spines increases their size and conduction which is thought to play a role in learning and memory formation. There are approximately 200,000 spines per cell, each of which serve as a postsynaptic process for individual presynaptic axons.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA