Oncology & Cancer

Immunotherapy to shrink treatment-resistant cancer tumors

Advancements in cancer research and treatment have resulted in great improvements in survival rates—today, there are almost 17 million people in the United States alone who have survived their diagnosis because of the physicians ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New mechanism in CD47 blockade treatment in HCC

China has the highest morbidity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the world. For HCC patients in early stage disease, surgical resection is the best treatment strategy, but most patients in advanced stages lose the opportunity ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer: The double advantage of killer T-cells

To grow, tumors rely on a specific structure, the tumor stroma. This includes blood vessels, which provide the nutrients necessary for the multiplication of diseased cells, and of lymphatic vessels, through which they migrate ...

Oncology & Cancer

Researchers find new mechanism to turn on cancer-killing T cells

Over the past decade, researchers have made great strides in the development and administration of cancer immunotherapies, which use the body's own immune system to treat disease. However, the therapies don't work for every ...

Oncology & Cancer

T-cell interactions vary between tumor microenvironments

A team led by Northwestern Medicine investigators has discovered differences in the distribution and interaction of T-cells within the microenvironment of different regions of both brain tumors and brain metastases, according ...

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Dendritic cell

Dendritic cells (DCs) are immune cells that form part of the mammalian immune system. Their main function is to process antigen material and present it on the surface to other cells of the immune system, thus functioning as antigen-presenting cells.

Dendritic cells are present in small quantities in tissues that are in contact with the external environment, mainly the skin (where there is a specialized dendritic cell type called Langerhans cells) and the inner lining of the nose, lungs, stomach and intestines. They can also be found in an immature state in the blood. Once activated, they migrate to the lymphoid tissues where they interact with T cells and B cells to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. At certain development stages they grow branched projections, the dendrites, that give the cell its name. However, these do not have any special relation with neurons, which also possess similar appendages. Immature dendritic cells are also called veiled cells, in which case they possess large cytoplasmic 'veils' rather than dendrites.

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