Health

Collagen in your coffee? A scientist says forget it

Collagen products are popping up everywhere. While collagen is probably most well known for its touted skin care benefits and as a major component of lip enhancers and injections, some celebrities, like Kourtney Kardashian, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia

A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher.

Health

Dietary supplements: How to avoid fake products

You probably have bought some type of supplement—maybe vitamins, herbs or probiotics—online or at a store. Maybe the doctor recommended it or maybe you heard that it's good for you.

Health

Do heart supplements work?

Which dietary supplements should you take to improve heart health? The answer may be none. Research published in Annals of Internal Medicine shows that many supplements do not reduce your risk of heart disease. Dr. M. Hassan ...

Health

Keep sugar substitute away from fido

(HealthDay)— The sugar substitute xylitol may help you lose weight, but it can be deadly for your dog, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Health

Broccoli you are sure to love

(HealthDay)—Looking to boost your fiber and vitamin C in one bite? Forget dietary supplements—emerald green broccoli is the answer.

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Dietary supplement

A dietary supplement, also known as food supplement or nutritional supplement, is a preparation intended to provide nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, fatty acids or amino acids, that are missing or are not consumed in sufficient quantity in a person's diet. Some countries define dietary supplements as foods, while in others they are defined as drugs.

Supplements containing vitamins or dietary minerals are included in the Codex Alimentarius Commission, a guidebook on food safety sponsored by the United Nations.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA