Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Cleaning product use affecting asthma more during COVID-19 measures

Those with asthma are experiencing less asthma control related to an increase in using household disinfectants—known asthma triggers—because of COVID-19, according to a survey co-conducted by University of Illinois Chicago ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Heating could be the best way to disinfect N95 masks for reuse

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, N95 face masks have been in short supply. Health care workers, in particular, desperately need these masks to protect themselves from the respiratory droplets of infected patients. ...

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Disinfectant

Disinfectants are substances that are applied to non-living objects to destroy microorganisms that are living on the objects. Disinfection does not necessarily kill all microorganisms, especially nonresistant bacterial spores; it is less effective than sterilisation, which is an extreme physical and/or chemical process that kills all types of life. Disinfectants are different from other antimicrobial agents such as antibiotics, which destroy microorganisms within the body, and antiseptics, which destroy microorganisms on living tissue. Disinfectants are also different from biocides — the latter are intended to destroy all forms of life, not just microorganisms.

Sanitisers are substances that simultaneously clean and disinfect.

Bacterial endospores are most resistant to disinfectants, but some viruses and bacteria also possess some tolerance.

Disinfectants are frequently used in hospitals, dental surgeries, kitchens, and bathrooms to kill infectious organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA