Obstetrics & gynaecology

Sequencing all 24 human chromosomes uncovers rare disorders

Extending noninvasive prenatal screening to all 24 human chromosomes can detect genetic disorders that may explain miscarriage and abnormalities during pregnancy, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes ...

Genetics

Scientists build better way to decode the genome

The genome is the body's instruction manual. It contains the raw information—in the form of DNA—that determines everything from whether an animal walks on four legs or two, to one's potential risk for disease. But this ...

Genetics

Cancer-preventing protein finds its own way in our DNA

Geneticists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that tumour protein TP53 knows exactly where to bind to our DNA to prevent cancer. Once bound to this specific DNA sequence, the protein can activate the right genes to repair ...

Genetics

Male Y chromosomes not 'genetic wastelands'

When researchers say they have sequenced the human genome, there is a caveat to this statement: a lot of the human genome is sequenced and assembled, but there are regions that are full of repetitive elements, making them ...

Medical research

Where cigarette smoking's damage is done... down to your DNA

Scientists have known for decades that smoking cigarettes causes DNA damage, which leads to lung cancer. Now, for the first time, UNC School of Medicine scientists created a method for effectively mapping that DNA damage ...

Medical research

Researchers detect age-related differences in DNA from blood

Researchers have discovered age- and health-related differences in fragments of DNA found floating in the bloodstream (not inside cells) called cell-free DNA (cfDNA). These differences could someday be used to determine biological ...

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