Health

Better treatment for diabetic foot ulcers

People with type 2 diabetes often suffer from poorly-healing infected wounds on their feet. Using existing methods, however, it takes two days to grow a bacterial culture used to identify the pathogens infecting the wound ...

Oncology & Cancer

New blood test capable of detecting multiple types of cancer

A new blood test in development has shown ability to screen for numerous types of cancer with a high degree of accuracy, a trial of the test shows. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators will present the results of the ...

Genetics

Whole genome sequencing for prenatal diagnosis

The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the Faculty of Medicine at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has successfully introduced a new genome sequencing technique for prenatal invasive genetic diagnosis. ...

Genetics

DNA changes accelerate body's aging process

DNA changes throughout a person's life can significantly increase their susceptibility to heart conditions and other age-related diseases, research suggests.

Cardiology

Health system offers free DNA tests for 10,000 Floridians

An operator of hospitals and clinics began offering free DNA testing on Wednesday to 10,000 Floridians in a partnership with a private genomics company. Some biomedical ethicists warn that participants need to realize their ...

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DNA profiling

DNA profiling (also called DNA testing, DNA typing, or genetic fingerprinting) is a technique employed by forensic scientists to assist in the identification of individuals on the basis of their respective DNA profiles. DNA profiles are encrypted sets of numbers that reflect a person's DNA makeup, which can also be used as the person's identifier. DNA profiling should not be confused with full genome sequencing.

Although 99.9% of human DNA sequences are the same in every person, enough of the DNA is different to distinguish one individual from another. DNA profiling uses repetitive ("repeat") sequences that are highly variable, called variable number tandem repeats (VNTR). VNTRs loci are very similar between closely related humans, but so variable that unrelated individuals are extremely unlikely to have the same VNTRs.

The DNA profiling technique was first reported in 1985 by Sir Alec Jeffreys at the University of Leicester in England, and is now the basis of several national DNA databases.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA