Psychology & Psychiatry

Childhood gender nonconformity in boys linked to early androgens

In laboratory animals, sex differences in behavior occur because different hormone levels produced by males and females influence patterns of gene expression in the developing brain. However, the origins of sex differences ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Biomarker could help diagnosis schizophrenia at an early age

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have discovered how levels of a protein could be used in the future as a blood-based diagnostic aid for schizophrenia. The activity of the protein, which is found in both the brain and ...

Health

Antioxidants and free radicals explained

Professor Barry Halliwell, Tan Chin Tuan Centennial Professor at NUS Biochemistry and the Life Sciences Institute, is one of the world's foremost experts in the field of antioxidants and free radicals. He began investigating ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Governments deaf to hearing loss, says WHO

One in four people around the world—nearly 2.5 billion—could face some degree of hearing loss by 2050 with at least 700 million requiring access to treatment and rehabilitation, a WHO report warns.

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Homo (genus)

Homo sapiens See text for extinct species.

Homo is the genus that includes modern humans and their close relatives. The genus is estimated to be about 2.5 million years old, evolving from Australopithecine ancestors with the appearance of Homo habilis. Appearance of Homo coincides with the first evidence of stone tools (the Oldowan industry), and thus by definition with the beginning of the Lower Paleolithic.

All species except Homo sapiens (modern humans) are extinct. Homo neanderthalensis, traditionally considered the last surviving relative, died out 24,000 years ago, while a recent discovery suggests that another species, Homo floresiensis, may have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Given the large number of morphological similarities exhibited, Homo is closely related to several extinct hominin genera, most notably Kenyanthropus, Paranthropus and Australopithecus. As of 2007[update], no taxon is universally accepted as the origin of the radiation of Homo.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA