Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

With hospitalizations up, France weighs return to masks

Tourism is booming again in France—and so is COVID-19. French officials have "invited" or "recommended" people to go back to using face masks but stopped short of renewing restrictions that would scare visitors away or ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New studies shed light on election-related stress

A new study from North Carolina State University finds that anticipating future stress related to political elections can affect people's emotional well-being before anything has even happened. But a related study shows that ...

Health

US reaches deal to reopen shuttered baby formula plant

U.S. officials on Monday reached an agreement to allow baby formula maker Abbott to restart its largest domestic factory, though it will be two months or more before any new products ship from the site to help alleviate the ...

Medications

US House votes for life-changing $35 insulin price cap

US lawmakers voted Thursday on a bill limiting the cost of insulin to $35 a month, a transformative curb for millions of diabetics who pay hundreds of dollars for the life-sustaining hormone.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

S. Korea has deadliest day of pandemic amid omicron surge

South Korea saw its deadliest day of the pandemic on Saturday, reporting 112 fatalities in the latest 24-hour period, as it grapples with a wave of coronavirus infections driven by the fast-moving omicron variant.

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Election

An election is a decision-making process by which a population chooses an individual to hold formal office. This is the usual mechanism by which modern representative democracy fills offices in the legislature, sometimes in the executive and judiciary, and for regional and local government. This process is also used in many other private and business organizations, from clubs to voluntary associations and corporations.

The universal use of elections as a tool for selecting representatives in modern democracies is in contrast with the practice in the democratic archetype, ancient Athens. Elections were considered an oligarchic institution and most political offices were filled using sortition, also known as allotment, by which officeholders were chosen by lot.

Electoral reform describes the process of introducing fair electoral systems where they are not in place, or improving the fairness or effectiveness of existing systems. Psephology is the study of results and other statistics relating to elections (especially with a view to predicting future results).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA