Psychology & Psychiatry

Covering faces around kids won't mask emotions

The proliferation of face coverings to keep COVID-19 in check isn't keeping kids from understanding facial expressions, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologists.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Children with dyslexia show stronger emotional responses

Children diagnosed with dyslexia show greater emotional reactivity than children without dyslexia, according to a new collaborative study by UC San Francisco neuroscientists with the UCSF Dyslexia Center and UCSF Memory and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Face it. Our faces don't always reveal our true emotions

Actor James Franco looks sort of happy as he records a video diary in the movie "127 Hours." It's not until the camera zooms out, revealing his arm is crushed under a boulder, that it becomes clear his goofy smile belies ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why smiles (and frowns) are contagious

Smile! It makes everyone in the room feel better because they, consciously or unconsciously, are smiling with you. Growing evidence shows that an instinct for facial mimicry allows us to empathize with and even experience ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The way you sound affects your mood

Researchers have created a digital audio platform that can modify theemotional tone of people's voices while they are talking, to make themsound happier, sadder or more fearful. New results show that whilelistening to their ...

Autism spectrum disorders

Face time: Tech reads facial expressions for autism symptoms

There's an app for everything these days—from weight loss to working out. Now, thanks in part to support from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), there's an app that may screen for autism by reading kids' facial expressions ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Our head movements convey emotions

When people talk or sing, they often nod, tilt or bow their heads to reinforce verbal messages. But how effective are these head gestures at conveying emotions?

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