Obstetrics & gynaecology

Endometriosis: No cure, but diagnosis could avert surgery

Jasmin Teurlings is one of 176 million women worldwide who have endometriosis, a chronic, painful gynecological condition that affects nearly three times as many women as breast cancer.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Endometriosis more common in teenage girls than previously thought

Teenage girls are just as likely to suffer with endometriosis as adult women, a finding which UCL and University of Birmingham researchers say is surprising and could help doctors provide better treatments for younger patients.

Genetics

Study links endometriosis to DNA changes

DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. The ...

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Endometriosis

Endometriosis (from endo, "inside", and metra, "womb") is a medical condition in women in which endometrial cells are deposited in areas outside the uterine cavity. The uterine cavity is lined by endometrial cells, which are under the influence of female hormones. Endometrial cells deposited in areas outside the uterus (endometriosis) continue to be influenced by these hormonal changes and respond similarly as do those cells found inside the uterus. Symptoms often exacerbate in time with the menstrual cycle.

Endometriosis is typically seen during the reproductive years; it has been estimated that it occurs in roughly 5% to 10% of women. Symptoms depend on the site of implantation. Its main but not universal symptom is pelvic pain in various manifestations. Endometriosis is a common[citation needed] finding in women with infertility.

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