Oncology & Cancer

Bespoke neuroblastoma therapy weaponizes cell metabolism

Preclinical research from VCU Massey Cancer Center published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the combination of two existing drugs can exploit the metabolic 'hunger' of a particularly ...

Overweight & Obesity

How human evolution busts myths about diet and exercise

Duke professor Herman Pontzer has spent his career counting calories. Not because he's watching his waistline, exactly. But because, as he sees it, "in the economics of life, calories are the currency." Every minute, everything ...

Cardiology

Ultra-processed foods are breaking your heart

Ultra-processed foods account for 58% of total energy in the average U.S. diet, but diet is a modifiable risk factor in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A study published in the Journal of the American College ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Tired at the office? Take a quick break; your work will benefit

Recent research shows that people are more likely to take "microbreaks" at work on days when they're tired—but that's not a bad thing. The researchers found microbreaks seem to help tired employees bounce back from their ...

Energy

In physics, energy (from the Greek ἐνέργεια - energeia, "activity, operation", from ἐνεργός - energos, "active, working") is a scalar physical quantity that describes the amount of work that can be performed by a force, an attribute of objects and systems that is subject to a conservation law. Different forms of energy include kinetic, potential, thermal, gravitational, sound, light, elastic, and electromagnetic energy. The forms of energy are often named after a related force.

Any form of energy can be transformed into another form, but the total energy always remains the same. This principle, the conservation of energy, was first postulated in the early 19th century, and applies to any isolated system. According to Noether's theorem, the conservation of energy is a consequence of the fact that the laws of physics do not change over time.

Although the total energy of a system does not change with time, its value may depend on the frame of reference. For example, a seated passenger in a moving airplane has zero kinetic energy relative to the airplane, but non-zero kinetic energy relative to the Earth.

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