Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Discovery suggests new route to fight infection, disease

New research reveals how a single protein interferes with the immune system when exposed to the bacterium that causes Legionnaires' disease, findings that could have broad implications for development of medicines to fight ...

Health

Roll-your-own tobacco could be more addictive

Research carried out at Victoria University suggests smokers of roll-your-own tobacco may be more intensely addicted to the habit than those who puff on manufactured cigarettes.

Medical research

Live longer with fewer calories

By consuming fewer calories, ageing can be slowed down and the development of age-related diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes can be delayed. The earlier calorie intake is reduced, the greater the effect. Researchers ...

Neuroscience

The Mechanisms of Memory

(PhysOrg.com) -- USC College's Michel Baudry and graduate student Sohila Zadran brought forty years of research to a pinnacle with their breakthroughs in the science of learning and memory.

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer suppressor gene links metabolism with cellular aging

The tumor suppressor protein p53 is an attractive target for drug developers. But this path has so far proven difficult, as most p53 regulatory proteins operate via protein-protein interactions, which make for poor drug targets, ...

Genetics

Ironing out the genetic cause of hemoglobin problems

(PhysOrg.com) -- A gene with a significant effect on regulating hemoglobin in the body has been identified as part of a genome-wide association study, which looked at the link between genes and hemoglobin level in 16,000 ...

Oncology & Cancer

When cancer cells can't let go

Like a climber scaling a rock face, a migrating cancer cell has to keep a tight grip on the surface but also let go at the right moment to move ahead. Chan et al. reveal that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) coordinates these ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Researchers work to block harmful behavior of key Alzheimer's enzyme

Enzymes rarely have one job. So, attempts to shut down the enzyme that causes the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease often mean side effects, because these therapies prevent the enzyme from carrying out many other functions. ...

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