Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Cognitive health may benefit from balanced meal timing

Globally, there are approximately 55 million people who suffer from dementia, and the incidence of the disease has steadily increased. The number of affected is expected to triple by 2050, particularly in low- and middle-income ...

Medications

Aspirin could increase survival in cancer

Does aspirin increase survival in cancer patients? UK researchers say that despite the smaller side-effects of aspirin, taking the drug has an overall positive effect on survival for people with cancer. The team reviewed ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

First-of-its-kind book addresses psychiatric epidemiology

The first volume of historical scholarship addressing psychiatric epidemiology was published over the summer, co-edited by CUNY SPH Professor Emeritus Gerald Oppenheimer. "Reimagining Psychiatric Epidemiology in a Global ...

Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the study of health-event, health-characteristic, or health-determinant patterns in a population. It is the cornerstone method of public health research, and helps inform policy decisions and evidence-based medicine by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for preventive medicine. Epidemiologists are involved in the design of studies, collection and statistical analysis of data, and interpretation and dissemination of results (including peer review and occasional systematic review). Major areas of epidemiological work include outbreak investigation, disease surveillance and screening (medicine), biomonitoring, and comparisons of treatment effects such as in clinical trials. Epidemiologists rely on a number of other scientific disciplines such as biology (to better understand disease processes), biostatistics (to make efficient use of the data and draw appropriate conclusions), and exposure assessment and social science disciplines (to better understand proximate and distal risk factors, and their measurement).

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