Medical research

Esophagus organoid holds promise for cancer research

Researchers at the University of Szeged in Hungary have demonstrated for the first time that an esophagus organoid successfully duplicates a vital function of that organ. The study is published in the American Journal of ...

Gastroenterology

New digital tool to better monitor Barrett's esophagus

A team including researchers from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a digital tool to better monitor a condition known as Barrett's esophagus, which affects more than 3 million people ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection

No evidence so far indicates that food or drinks can transmit the virus that causes COVID-19, but new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that people with problems in the upper gastrointestinal ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Smart software detects early-stage esophageal cancer

Thanks to smart software doctors will soon be able to detect early signs of esophageal cancer in patients with so-called Barrett's esophagus. This is the result of research conducted by Amsterdam UMC, the Catharina Hospital ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Could your indigestion be GERD?

(HealthDay)—Heartburn. Millions of people suffer from it. But what exactly is it and, most important, could it actually be something serious?

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Esophagus

The esophagus (or oesophagus) is an organ in vertebrates which consists of a muscular tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. During swallowing, food passes from the mouth through the pharynx into the esophagus and travels via peristalsis to the stomach. The word esophagus is derived from the Latin œsophagus, which derives from the Greek word oisophagos , lit. "entrance for eating." In humans the esophagus is continuous with the laryngeal part of the pharynx at the level of the C6 vertebra. The esophagus passes through posterior mediastinum in thorax and enters abdomen through a hole in the diaphragm at the level of the tenth thoracic vertebrae (T10). It is usually about 25–30 cm long depending on individual height. It is divided into cervical, thoracic and abdominal parts. Due to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle, the entry to the esophagus opens only when swallowing or vomiting.

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