Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Buying time for people approaching Alzheimer's

Australians living with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) could know five years in advance whether they are at high risk of developing Alzheimer's disease—the most common form of dementia—according to new research from ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Medicare mulls coverage for controversial Alzheimer's drug

(Healthday)—Medicare launched a formal process on Monday that will determine whether the agency will cover Aduhelm, the newly approved Alzheimer's drug whose high price tag and unproven benefits have prompted widespread ...

Genetics

UN calls for global database of human gene editing research

The World Health Organization issued new recommendations Monday on human genome editing, calling for a global registry to track "any form of genetic manipulation" and proposing a whistle-blowing mechanism to raise concerns ...

Oncology & Cancer

Updated recommendations for managing hereditary breast cancer

(HealthDay)—One year of adjuvant olaparib should be offered to patients with high-risk early-stage human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer and germline BRCA mutations after completion of (neo)adjuvant ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

South Korea's cases jump to 1,200 amid slow vaccination

South Korea on Wednesday reported 1,212 new cases, a steep rise in coronavirus infections unseen since the winter outbreak as it slips into another surge while most of its people are still unvaccinated.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Researchers zero in on longer lockdowns to crush COVID-19

The NSW Government faces a high-pressure decision this week about whether to relax current restrictions because of the latest COVID-19 outbreak, according to an expert from The Australian National University (ANU).

Vaccination

With so few virus deaths, Australians debate vaccine risks

Australia has weathered the pandemic far better than many nations—recording just a single coronavirus death since last October—but its success means many Australians are not in a rush to get vaccinated and that could ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Have a pandemic plan? Most people did not

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic last year, medical experts have stressed the importance of having a plan in the event of a positive test result. Where should you self-isolate? Do you have personal protective equipment ...

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Expert

An expert ( Audio (US) (help·info), also called cognoscente) is someone widely recognized as a reliable source of technique or skill whose faculty for judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely is accorded authority and status by their peers or the public in a specific well-distinguished domain. An expert, more generally, is a person with extensive knowledge or ability based on research, experience, or occupation and in a particular area of study. Experts are called in for advice on their respective subject, but they do not always agree on the particulars of a field of study. An expert can be, by virtue of credential, training, education, profession, publication or experience, believed to have special knowledge of a subject beyond that of the average person, sufficient that others may officially (and legally) rely upon the individual's opinion. Historically, an expert was referred to as a sage (Sophos). The individual was usually a profound thinker distinguished for wisdom and sound judgment.

Experts have a prolonged or intense experience through practice and education in a particular field. In specific fields, the definition of expert is well established by consensus and therefore it is not necessary for an individual to have a professional or academic qualification for them to be accepted as an expert. In this respect, a shepherd with 50 years of experience tending flocks would be widely recognized as having complete expertise in the use and training of sheep dogs and the care of sheep. Another example from computer science is that an expert system may be taught by a human and thereafter considered an expert, often outperforming human beings at particular tasks. In law, an expert witness must be recognized by argument and authority.

Research in this area attempts to understand the relation between expert knowledge and exceptional performance in terms of cognitive structures and processes. The fundamental research endeavor is to describe what it is that experts know and how they use their knowledge to achieve performance that most people assume requires extreme or extraordinary ability. Studies have investigated the factors that enable experts to be fast and accurate.

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