Psychology & Psychiatry

Eye contact with your baby helps synchronise your brainwaves

Making eye contact with an infant makes adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other – which is likely to support communication and learning – according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.

Psychology & Psychiatry

A tilt of the head facilitates social engagement, researchers say

Every time we look at a face, we take in a flood of information effortlessly: age, gender, race, expression, the direction of our subject's gaze, perhaps even their mood. Faces draw us in and help us navigate relationships ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Research pinpoints indicators of attraction

How can you tell if someone likes you? New research led by University of Dayton associate professor of psychology R. Matthew Montoya helps answer that question by identifying a list of nonverbal behaviors to watch for—identified ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

It's all in the eyes: Women and men really do see things differently

Women and men look at faces and absorb visual information in different ways, which suggests there is a gender difference in understanding visual cues, according to a team of scientists that included psychologists from Queen ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Being ignored hurts, even by a stranger

(Medical Xpress) -- Feeling like you’re part of the gang is crucial to the human experience. All people get stressed out when we’re left out. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Making eye contact doesn't always help your cause

New research shows that making eye contact, long considered an effective way of bringing someone to your point of view, may actually make people more resistant to persuasion, especially when they already disagree.

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