Cardiology

Price of alirocumab would have to be cut to be cost-effective

(HealthDay)—For patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome receiving a statin, the price of alirocumab would have to be reduced to be cost-effective, according to a study published online Jan. 1 in the Annals of Internal ...

Cardiology

Atorvastatin/Ezetimibe beats atorvastatin after PCI

(HealthDay)—For Japanese patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), atorvastatin plus ezetimibe is associated with improved outcomes versus atorvastatin alone, according to a study published in ...

Cardiology

Drug policy impacts regional trends of ezetimibe use

(HealthDay)—Within Canada, regional variation has been noted in ezetimibe use, which is associated with the restrictiveness of publicly-funded drug formularies, according to a study published online June 3 in Circulation: ...

Cardiology

Evolocumab superior to ezetimibe in lowering LDL cholesterol

Evolocumab, an injected form of a class of drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, also known as LDL-C or "bad cholesterol," outperformed ezetimibe with few side effects in patients unable ...

Cardiology

New drug significantly lowers bad cholesterol

For many people with high cholesterol, statins serve as the first line of treatment. However, some patients are unable to effectively reduce their low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol) or "bad cholesterol" ...

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Ezetimibe

Ezetimibe ( /ɛˈzɛtɨmɪb/) is a drug that lowers cholesterol. It acts by decreasing cholesterol absorption in the intestine. It may be used alone (marketed as Zetia or Ezetrol), when other cholesterol-lowering medications are not tolerated, or together with statins (e.g., ezetimibe/simvastatin, marketed as Vytorin and Inegy) when statins alone do not control cholesterol.

Even though ezetimibe decreases cholesterol levels, the results of two major, high-quality clinical trials (in 2008 and 2009) showed that it did not improve clinically significant outcomes, such as major coronary events, and actually made some outcomes, such as artery wall thickness, worse. Indeed, a panel of experts concluded in 2008 that it should "only be used as a last resort". In one of those studies, a head-to-head trial in 2009, a much less expensive medication (extended-release niacin) was found to be superior. Ezetimibe actually increased the thickness of artery walls (a measurement of atherosclerosis) and caused more major cardiovascular events. However, in combination with simvastatin, a 2010 trial has shown it to be better than atorvastatin and rosuvastatin at lowering lipid levels. A significantly more positive view of the benefits of Ezetimibe is offered by Britain's NICE.

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