Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Buzz off: breakthrough technique eradicates mosquitoes

A breakthrough technique harnessing two methods to target disease-carrying mosquitoes was able to effectively eradicate buzzing biters in two test sites in China, according to research published on Thursday.

Genetics

Famous cancer-fighting gene also protects against birth defects

New research has revealed how the famous tumour suppressor gene p53 is surprisingly critical for development of the neural tube in female embryos. This is important because healthy development of the neural tube is needed ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychedelic microdosing in rats shows beneficial effects

The growing popularity of microdosing—taking tiny amounts of psychedelic drugs to boost mood and mental acuity—is based on anecdotal reports of its benefits. Now, a study in rats by researchers at the University of ...

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Female

Female (♀) is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces mobile ova (egg cells). The ova are defined as the larger gametes in a heterogamous reproduction system, while the smaller, usually motile gamete, the spermatozoon, is produced by the male. A female individual cannot reproduce sexually without access to the gametes of a male (an exception is parthenogenesis). Some organisms can reproduce both sexually and asexually.

There is no single genetic mechanism behind sex differences in different species and the existence of two sexes seems to have evolved multiple times independently in different evolutionary lineages. Other than the defining difference in the type of gamete produced, differences between males and females in one lineage cannot always be predicted by differences in another. The concept is not limited to animals; egg cells are produced by chytrids, diatoms, water moulds and land plants, among others. In land plants, female and male designate not only the egg- and sperm-producing organisms and structures, but also the structures of the sporophytes that give rise to male and female plants.

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