Immunology

Fever alters immune cells so they can better reach infections

Fever is known to help power up our immune cells, and scientists in Shanghai have new evidence explaining how. They found in mice that fever alters surface proteins on immune cells like lymphocytes to make them better able ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How to tell if your symptoms are cold, flu or allergies

A runny or stuffy nose can be a symptom of the flu, a cold or allergies, and it can be hard to discern which one you have. So how do you know what's really going on with your nose?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Is it a cold or flu? Here's how to tell

(HealthDay)—With a severe flu season now widespread across 46 states, do symptoms you or a loved one have point to the dreaded illness?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

'Upsurge' of scarlet fever in England, study warns

Scarlet fever, a common cause of childhood death in the 1800s and early 1900s, has seen an upsurge in England since 2011 after decades of decline, scientists said Tuesday.

Medical research

How fever in early pregnancy causes heart, facial birth defects

Researchers have known for decades that fevers in the first trimester of pregnancy increase risk for some heart defects and facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate. Exactly how this happens is unclear. Scientists have ...

Immunology

Natural lipid acts as potent anti-inflammatory

National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a naturally occurring lipid—a waxy, fatty acid—used by a disease-causing bacterium to impair the host immune response and increase the chance of infection. Inadvertently, ...

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Fever

Fever (also known as pyrexia) is a common medical sign characterized by an elevation of temperature above the normal range of 36.5–37.5 °C (98–100 °F) due to an increase in the body temperature regulatory set-point. This increase in set-point triggers increased muscle tone and shivering.

As a person's temperature increases, there is, in general, a feeling of cold despite an increasing body temperature. Once the new temperature is reached, there is a feeling of warmth. A fever can be caused by many different conditions ranging from benign to potentially serious. There are arguments for and against the usefulness of fever, and the issue is controversial. With the exception of very high temperatures, treatment to reduce fever is often not necessary; however, antipyretic medications can be effective at lowering the temperature, which may improve the affected person's comfort.

Fever differs from uncontrolled hyperthermia, in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the body's thermoregulatory set-point, due to excessive heat production and/or insufficient thermoregulation.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA