Dentistry

Making the case for fluoridated water

A recent University of Alaska study that found an increase in childhood dental decay in two cities that halted the use of fluoridated water demonstrates why this public health measure is needed, says Dean Cecile A. Feldman ...

Dentistry

Fluoride varnish in the primary dentition can prevent caries

Whereas caries in adults and adolescents is declining, studies in children under the age of 3 have shown that caries in this age group has hardly decreased: On average, about 14% of all 3-year-olds in Germany have caries ...

Dentistry

Guidelines for fluoride intake—are they appropriate?

The appropriate use of fluoride has transformed oral health over the past 70 years, in part due to the guidelines created for fluoride intake. Recently, researchers are questioning these longstanding guidelines which served ...

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Fluoride

Fluoride is the anion F−, the reduced form of fluorine when as an ion and when bonded to another element. Both organofluorine compounds and inorganic fluorine containing compounds are called fluorides. Fluoride, like other halides, is a monovalent ion (−1 charge). Its compounds often have properties that are distinct relative to other halides. Structurally, and to some extent chemically, the fluoride ion resembles the hydroxide ion. Fluorine-containing compounds range from potent toxins such as sarin to life-saving pharmaceuticals such as efavirenz, and from inert materials such as carbon tetrafluoride to the highly reactive sulfur tetrafluoride. The range of fluorine-containing compounds is vast because fluorine is capable of forming compounds with all the elements except helium and neon.

Compounds containing fluoride anions and in many cases those containing covalent bonds to fluorine are called fluorides.

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