Diabetes

Consumption of added sugar doubles fat production

Too much sugar is unhealthy—that we know, but it's not just down to the many calories. Even moderate amounts of added fructose and sucrose double the body's own fat production in the liver, researchers from the University ...

Diabetes

High fructose diets could cause immune system damage

New research by Swansea scientists in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bristol and the Francis Crick Institute in London has indicated that consuming a diet high in the sugar fructose might prevent the ...

Health

Ring in the new year with a 'Mocktail'

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News)—At a time when many people are stress-drinking, a New Year's Eve sangria that's alcohol-free is a healthy way to say farewell to 2020.

Gastroenterology

High-sugar diet can damage the gut, intensifying risk for colitis

Mice fed diets high in sugar developed worse colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and researchers examining their large intestines found more of the bacteria that can damage the gut's protective mucus layer.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Study reveals dietary fructose heightens inflammatory bowel disease

Diet remains an important part of disease prevention and management, and a new study suggests that consumption of fructose may worsen intestinal inflammation common to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Led by David Montrose, ...

page 1 from 14

Fructose

Fructose (also levulose or laevulose) is a simple reducing sugar found in many foods and is one of the three important dietary monosaccharides along with glucose and galactose. Honey, tree fruits, berries, melons, and some root vegetables, such as beets, sweet potatoes, parsnips, and onions, contain fructose, usually in combination with glucose in the form of sucrose. Fructose is also derived from the digestion of granulated table sugar (sucrose), a disaccharide consisting of glucose and fructose.

Crystalline fructose and high-fructose corn syrup are often mistakenly confused as the same product. The former is produced from a fructose-enriched corn syrup which results in a finished product of at least 98% fructose. The latter is usually supplied as a mixture of nearly equal amounts of fructose and glucose.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA