Health

How to eliminate added sugars from your diet

People are getting the message about the dangers of sugar. Nearly 70% of Americans have cut back on foods high in added sugars, according to a survey by the International Food Information Council Foundation. But there's still ...

Overweight & Obesity

How to help when your child weighs too much

(HealthDay)—Seventeen percent of American children and teens are obese and a nearly equal number are overweight, and those who are taunted about their weight tend to gain even more in response, according to a study from ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Liver illness strikes Latino children like a 'silent tsunami'

Saira Diaz uses her fingers to count the establishments selling fast food and sweets near the South Los Angeles home she shares with her parents and 13-year-old son. "There's one, two, three, four, five fast-food restaurants," ...

Oncology & Cancer

High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice

Does sugar directly feed cancers, boosting their growth? The answer seems to be 'Yes' at least in mice according to a study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Weill Cornell Medicine. Their study, published ...

Medical research

Sugar targets gut microbe linked to lean and healthy people

Sugar can silence a key protein required for colonization by a gut bacterium associated with lean and healthy individuals, according to a new Yale study published the week of Dec. 17 in the journal Proceedings of the National ...

page 1 from 12

Fructose

Fructose (also levulose or laevulose) is a simple reducing sugar found in many foods and is one of the three important dietary monosaccharides along with glucose and galactose. Honey, tree fruits, berries, melons, and some root vegetables, such as beets, sweet potatoes, parsnips, and onions, contain fructose, usually in combination with glucose in the form of sucrose. Fructose is also derived from the digestion of granulated table sugar (sucrose), a disaccharide consisting of glucose and fructose.

Crystalline fructose and high-fructose corn syrup are often mistakenly confused as the same product. The former is produced from a fructose-enriched corn syrup which results in a finished product of at least 98% fructose. The latter is usually supplied as a mixture of nearly equal amounts of fructose and glucose.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA