Psychology & Psychiatry

More Australians affected by gambling and for longer

On the eve of the Melbourne Cup, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found more Australians are experiencing gambling harm and suffering life and health hardships for much longer than previously ...

Neuroscience

Casino lights and sounds encourage risky decision-making

The blinking lights and exciting jingles in casinos may encourage risky decision-making and potentially promote problem gambling behaviour, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How gambling distorts reality and hooks your brain

To call gambling a "game of chance" evokes fun, random luck and a sense of collective engagement. These playful connotations may be part of why almost 80 percent of American adults gamble at some point in their lifetime. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New ways to target gambling harm identified

New insights into gambling addiction from those experiencing its harmful effects will help inform more effective treatment and interventions.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Gaming or gambling? Online transactions blur boundaries

In-game purchasing systems, such as 'loot boxes', in popular online games resemble gambling and may pose financial risks for vulnerable players, according to gambling psychology researchers at the University of Adelaide.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Videogame loot boxes similar to gambling

Adolescents playing video games that offer randomised rewards to increase competitive advantage could possibly be exposed to mechanisms that are psychologically similar to gambling, according to new research just published ...

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Gambling

Gambling is the wagering of money or something of material value on an event with an uncertain outcome with the primary intent of winning additional money and/or material goods. Typically, the outcome of the wager is evident within a short period.

The term gaming in this context typically refers to instances in which the activity has been specifically permitted by law. The two words are not mutually exclusive; i.e., a “gaming” company offers (legal) “gambling” activities to the public. This distinction is not universally observed in the English-speaking world, however. For instance, in the UK, the regulator of gambling activities is called the Gambling Commission (not the Gaming Commission).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA