Neuroscience

Why visual stimulation may work against Alzheimer's

Several years ago, MIT neuroscientists showed that they could dramatically reduce the amyloid plaques seen Alzheimer's disease in mice simply by exposing the animals to light flickering at a specific frequency.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms

By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

Autism spectrum disorders

Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can impair communication ability, socialization, and verbal and motor skills. It generally starts in early childhood and is diagnosed through behavior observation. ...

Neuroscience

Why some images trigger seizures

In people with photosensitive epilepsy, flashing lights are well known for their potential to trigger seizures. The results can be quite stunning. For instance, a particular episode of Pokémon sent 685 people in Japan to ...

Neuroscience

Gamma oscillations coordinate food seeking

Food seeking is a crucial survival instinct. However, until recently, little was known about how the brain regulates this behavior. Scientists at the Leibniz-Institut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and NeuroCure Cluster ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Unique visual stimulation may be new treatment for Alzheimer's

Using LED lights flickering at a specific frequency, MIT researchers have shown that they can substantially reduce the beta amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease, in the visual cortex of mice.

page 1 from 2