Autism spectrum disorders

Can watching movies detect autism?

Measuring children's gaze patterns as they watch movies of social interactions is a reliable way to accurately identify nearly half of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) cases, according to a new study just published in Autism ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Eye contact reduces lying

A new study from the University of Tampere found that eye contact can make people act more honestly. In everyday life, we often find ourselves in situations where we suspect that someone is being untruthful, whether it is ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Eye contact with your baby helps synchronise your brainwaves

Making eye contact with an infant makes adults' and babies' brainwaves 'get in sync' with each other – which is likely to support communication and learning – according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Preliminary stages of dementia reduce human face memorization ability

A Japanese research group has revealed that elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have a particularly weakened ability to memorize human faces in the short term when compared to healthy elderly people. MCI patients ...

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Gaze

Gaze is a psychoanalytical term brought into popular usage by Jacques Lacan to describe the anxious state that comes with the awareness that one can be viewed. The psychological effect, Lacan argues, is that the subject loses some sense of autonomy upon realizing that he or she is a visible object. This concept is bound with his theory of the mirror stage, in which a child encountering a mirror realizes that he or she has an external appearance. Lacan suggests that this gaze effect can similarly be produced by any conceivable object such as a chair or a television screen. This is not to say that the object behaves optically as a mirror; instead it means that the awareness of any object can induce an awareness of also being an object.

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