Ophthalmology

Allowing blind people to see again with a wireless implant

Being able to see without eyes sounds like a miracle, but in the not-too-distant future, a new brain chip could allow the blind and visually impaired to perceive images again. Ph.D. student Adedayo Omisakin worked on wireless ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why we feel confident about decisions we make

Buying a second-hand car at a good price feels good. But choosing a delicious-looking doughnut in the supermarket leaves us riddled with doubt. After all, we resolved to eat a healthier diet this year—so wouldn't it be ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Scientists develop an RNA-based breath test to detect COVID-19

In a new study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, investigators report on the design and testing of a breathalyzer, known as the Bubbler, that relies on viral RNA detection to diagnose SARS-CoV-2. Its name is derived ...

Ophthalmology

Eyeglasses for school kids boosts academic performance

Students who received eyeglasses through a school-based program scored higher on reading and math tests, Johns Hopkins researchers from the Wilmer Eye Institute and School of Education found in the largest clinical study ...

Biomedical technology

Implants made with bioactive glasses and metals

Medical devices made of bioactive glasses and metals that dissolve at the end of their operational lifespan could replace other types of implants and eliminate the need for invasive removal once they have served their purpose, ...

Vaccination

Inside COVID vaccine production at BioNTech's new plant

Decontamination chambers, tight-fitting protective suits, a controlled atmosphere: vigilance is the order of the day when making COVID-19 vaccines at the new BioNTech plant in Marburg, Germany.

Biomedical technology

Broadening horizons for people with quadriplegia

A system that uses flexible, breathable magnetic skin allows people with severe quadriplegia to move around and choose their surroundings. Developed by KAUST researchers, the high-tech system relies on the user's facial expressions ...

Health

Ring in the new year with a 'Mocktail'

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30, 2020 (American Heart Association News)—At a time when many people are stress-drinking, a New Year's Eve sangria that's alcohol-free is a healthy way to say farewell to 2020.

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Glass

Glass generally refers to hard, brittle, transparent material, such as those used for windows, many bottles, or eyewear. Examples of such solid materials include, but are not limited to, soda-lime glass, borosilicate glass, acrylic glass, sugar glass, isinglass (Muscovy-glass), or aluminium oxynitride. In the technical sense, glass is an inorganic product of fusion which has been cooled through the glass transition to a rigid condition without crystallizing. Many glasses contain silica as their main component and glass former.

In the scientific sense the term glass is often extended to all amorphous solids (and melts that easily form amorphous solids), including plastics, resins, or other silica-free amorphous solids. In addition, besides traditional melting techniques, any other means of preparation are considered, such as ion implantation, and the sol-gel method. However, glass science and physics commonly includes only inorganic amorphous solids, while plastics and similar organics are covered by polymer science, biology and further scientific disciplines.

Glass plays an essential role in science and industry. The optical and physical properties of glass make it suitable for applications such as flat glass, container glass, optics and optoelectronics material, laboratory equipment, thermal insulator (glass wool), reinforcement fiber (glass-reinforced plastic, glass fiber reinforced concrete), and art.

The term glass developed in the late Roman Empire. It was in the Roman glassmaking center at Trier, Germany, that the late-Latin term glesum originated, probably from a Germanic word for a transparent, lustrous substance.

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