Medical research

Human cells can also change jobs

Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation. By inducing non-insulin-producing human pancreatic cells to modify their function to produce insulin in ...

Diabetes

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future

Diabetes is the inability to produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels, due to damaged or non-existing insulin cells. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels.

Cardiology

Certain SGLT2 inhibitors, GLP-1 RAs for T2DM also cut CV risk

(HealthDay)—Certain sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) demonstrate significant cardiovascular (CV) benefit and should be used for reducing CV risk ...

Medical research

Uncovering the whole story in diabetes

More than 400 million people worldwide suffer from type 2 diabetes, a disease characterised by increased blood glucose levels, because the body's normal way of controlling insulin release breaks down.

Diabetes

Improved rescue kits for people with diabetes, hypoglycemia

Being with someone who has diabetes and needs immediate care to avoid a coma can be a frightening situation. Even worse, current products and injection kits to help in those emergencies can be complicated to use.

Diabetes

mAb glucagon receptor blocker suitable for further development

(HealthDay)—The glucagon receptor blocker REGN1193, a fully human monoclonal antibody, seems safe and tolerable enough for further development, according to a study published online July 28 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Glucagon

Glucagon, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, raises blood glucose levels. Its effect is opposite that of insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. The pancreas releases glucagon when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall too low. Glucagon causes the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose, which is released into the bloodstream. High blood glucose levels stimulate the release of insulin. Insulin allows glucose to be taken up and used by insulin-dependent tissues. Thus, glucagon and insulin are part of a feedback system that keeps blood glucose levels at a stable level. Glucagon belongs to a family of several other related hormones.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA