Diabetes

Study explores dose ranges for efpeglenatide in early T2DM

(HealthDay)—Efpeglenatide once weekly leads to dose-dependent reductions in glucose and body weight in patients with early type 2 diabetes, according to a phase 2 study published online July 18 in Diabetes Care.

Diabetes

FDA approves first noninjection glucagon therapy

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first noninjection glucagon therapy for emergency treatment of severe hypoglycemia, the agency announced late yesterday.

Medical research

New discovery could lead to improved blood sugar level control

Many diabetes patients do not only have problems with their insulin, but also with the release of the hormone glucagon. Researchers at Uppsala University have now discovered a regulation mechanism which could provide an opportunity ...

Diabetes

Diabetes' sworn enemy could ultimately be a valuable ally

When people talk about diabetes, they usually also talk about insulin. Diabetes is a disease that affects millions of people around the world; insulin is a hormone that helps control this disease. Now a third term could soon ...

Medical research

Human cells can also change jobs

Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation. By inducing non-insulin-producing human pancreatic cells to modify their function to produce insulin in ...

Diabetes

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future

Diabetes is the inability to produce insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels, due to damaged or non-existing insulin cells. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels.

Cardiology

Certain SGLT2 inhibitors, GLP-1 RAs for T2DM also cut CV risk

(HealthDay)—Certain sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) demonstrate significant cardiovascular (CV) benefit and should be used for reducing CV risk ...

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Glucagon

Glucagon, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, raises blood glucose levels. Its effect is opposite that of insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. The pancreas releases glucagon when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall too low. Glucagon causes the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose, which is released into the bloodstream. High blood glucose levels stimulate the release of insulin. Insulin allows glucose to be taken up and used by insulin-dependent tissues. Thus, glucagon and insulin are part of a feedback system that keeps blood glucose levels at a stable level. Glucagon belongs to a family of several other related hormones.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA