Diabetes

Post-transplant diabetes may be reversible

Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM), a common complication of immunosuppressive drugs that are given to prevent transplant rejection, may be reversible and at least partially preventable, researchers at Vanderbilt ...

Medical research

A single, master switch for sugar levels?

A single neuron appears to monitor and control sugar levels in the fly body, according to research published this week in Nature. This new insight into the mechanisms in the fly brain that maintain a balance of two key hormones ...

Diabetes

Study explores dose ranges for efpeglenatide in early T2DM

(HealthDay)—Efpeglenatide once weekly leads to dose-dependent reductions in glucose and body weight in patients with early type 2 diabetes, according to a phase 2 study published online July 18 in Diabetes Care.

Diabetes

FDA approves first noninjection glucagon therapy

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first noninjection glucagon therapy for emergency treatment of severe hypoglycemia, the agency announced late yesterday.

Medical research

New discovery could lead to improved blood sugar level control

Many diabetes patients do not only have problems with their insulin, but also with the release of the hormone glucagon. Researchers at Uppsala University have now discovered a regulation mechanism which could provide an opportunity ...

page 1 from 7

Glucagon

Glucagon, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, raises blood glucose levels. Its effect is opposite that of insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. The pancreas releases glucagon when blood sugar (glucose) levels fall too low. Glucagon causes the liver to convert stored glycogen into glucose, which is released into the bloodstream. High blood glucose levels stimulate the release of insulin. Insulin allows glucose to be taken up and used by insulin-dependent tissues. Thus, glucagon and insulin are part of a feedback system that keeps blood glucose levels at a stable level. Glucagon belongs to a family of several other related hormones.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA