Oncology & Cancer

Study shows why many cancer cells need to import fat

Columbia and MIT researchers are revealing the surprising reasons why cancer cells are often forced to rely on fat imports, a finding that could lead to new ways to understand and slow down tumor growth.

Surgery

Scarless skin grafting using mussel adhesive protein

The biggest concerns for patients undergoing skin grafting are scarring post-surgery and the regeneration of transplanted skin. The depth of scarring after suturing varies depending on the skill of the medical personnel performing ...

Oncology & Cancer

How tumors make immune cells 'go bad'

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai Cancer have discovered that cancerous tumors called soft-tissue sarcomas produce a protein that switches immune cells from tumor-attacking to tumor-promoting. The study, published today in ...

Oncology & Cancer

New model helps identify mutations that drive cancer

Cancer cells can have thousands of mutations in their DNA. However, only a handful of those actually drive the progression of cancer; the rest are just along for the ride.

Oncology & Cancer

Breakthrough study of hormone 'cross-talk' in breast cancer

Scientists led by EPFL have successfully engrafted breast cancer cells on mice, allowing them to study in vivo the cross-talk between the estrogen and progesterone receptors that hampers hormone therapies. Their findings ...

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Growth

Growth refers to an increase in some quantity over time. The quantity can be physical (e.g., growth in height, growth in an amount of money) or abstract (e.g., a system becoming more complex, an organism becoming more mature). It can also refer to the mode of growth, i.e. numeric models for describing how much a particular quantity grows over time.

Biology

Social Science

Economy

Numerical Models

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA