Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

2018 to 2019 influenza season in U.S. was longest in 10 years

In the United States, the 2018 to 2019 influenza season was of moderate severity and lasted 21 weeks, according to research published in the June 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans

A universal flu vaccine that could prevent a potential influenza pandemic has been a holy grail for epidemiologists around the world ever since the first flu vaccines were developed in 1938.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

This year the flu came in two waves—here's why

The just-ended 2018-2019 flu season was relatively mild compared to the last season, during which nearly 80,000 people in the U.S. died of flu-related illness, according to estimates by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus

The ever-changing "head" of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report scientists funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the National Institutes of Health. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

U.S. flu cases hit 7 million mark: CDC

(HealthDay)—The flu season is picking up steam, with about 7 million Americans having been infected with a strain of the flu virus, health officials said Friday.

Pediatrics

Newborns face risks when born to women with the flu

Pregnant women with influenza are more likely to experience complications, but how this affects infants is unclear. A new Birth Defects Research study uncovers the potential risks to infants.

page 1 from 13

Influenza A virus subtype H1N1

Influenza A(H1N1) virus is a subtype of influenzavirus A and the most common cause of influenza (flu) in humans. Some strains of H1N1 are endemic in humans and cause a small fraction of all influenza-like illness and a large fraction of all seasonal influenza. H1N1 strains caused roughly half of all human flu infections in 2006. Other strains of H1N1 are endemic in pigs (swine influenza) and in birds (avian influenza).

In June 2009, World Health Organization declared that flu due to a new strain of swine-origin H1N1 was responsible for the 2009 flu pandemic. This strain is commonly called "swine flu" by the public media.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA