Psychology & Psychiatry

Happy spouse, healthy you

(HealthDay)—Many studies have shown that a stable and happy marriage is good for the health of both partners, increasing longevity. But did you know that there's also a link between one spouse's happiness and the health ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

New research sheds light on how happy couples argue

In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. And research shows they tend to argue about the same topics as unhappy couples: children, money, in-laws, intimacy.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How a sense of purpose can link creativity to happiness

There are plenty of famous artists who have produced highly creative work while they were deeply unhappy or suffering from poor mental health. In 1931, the poet T.S. Eliot wrote a letter to a friend describing his "considerable ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The sad truth about happiness scales

You might feel sad after looking closer at studies about happiness. That's because an emotion that's easy to experience is immensely difficult to measure, says Purdue University economist Timothy Bond.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Humans aren't designed to be happy

A huge happiness and positive thinking industry, estimated to be worth US$11 billion a year, has helped to create the fantasy that happiness is a realistic goal. Chasing the happiness dream is a very American concept, exported ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Can a budget make you happier?

(HealthDay)—Clever websites and smartphone apps have made creating a household budget easier, though it's still an unappealing chore for some. But what if using a tool that makes you smarter about money could also make ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Negative personal experiences add meaning to life

While many people say they appreciate positive experiences more than negative ones, there is a hidden benefit of negative experiences. While someone involved in a negative situation might not enjoy it, a recent study from ...

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Happiness

Happiness is a state of mind or feeling characterized by contentment, satisfaction, pleasure, or joy. A variety of philosophical, religious, psychological and biological approaches have striven to define happiness and identify its sources.

Philosophers and religious thinkers often define happiness in terms of living a good life, or flourishing, rather than simply as an emotion. Happiness in this older sense was used to translate the Greek Eudaimonia, and is still used in virtue ethics. In everyday speech today, however, terms such as well-being or quality of life are usually used to signify the classical meaning, and happiness usually refers[citation needed] to the felt experience or experiences that philosophers historically called pleasure.

While direct measurement of happiness presents challenges, tools such as The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire have been developed by researchers. Positive psychology researchers use theoretical models that include describing happiness as consisting of positive emotions and positive activities, or that describe three kinds of happiness: pleasure, engagement, and meaning.

Research has identified a number of attributes that correlate with happiness:[citation needed] relationships and social interaction, parenthood, marital status, religious involvement, age, income (but mainly up to the point where survival needs are met), and proximity to other happy people.

Happiness economics suggests that measures of public happiness should be used to supplement more traditional economic measures when evaluating the success of public policy.

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