Neuroscience

Study evaluates effect of heading a ball in soccer

The soccer ball is racing at a speed of 80 km/hr when the player uses their head to redirect it and score. Their team wins the game—but at what cost? UBC Okanagan research suggests the price is high.

Neuroscience

Hits, not concussions, cause CTE

Researchers have identified evidence of early Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology after head impact—even in the absence of signs of concussion. Early indicators of CTE pathology not only persisted long ...

Health

Can headband sensors reduce underreported concussions in kids?

In one of the most exciting soccer games of the season, Kelly jumped to head the ball and score, imagining this would be the game-winning goal. Out of nowhere, the goalie jumped and met Kelly's head with both fists. Kelly ...

Pediatrics

Head hits can be reduced in youth football

Less contact during practice could mean a lot less exposure to head injuries for young football players, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Virginia Tech.

Health

Study results reinforce importance of helmet use

Bicycle helmets certified to Australia's national standard significantly reduce the causes of head, skull and brain injury - linear and angular head accelerations, and the impact force of a crash - a new laboratory study ...

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