Radiology & Imaging

Novel MRI contrast agent sidesteps toxic effects of current products

Adding a contrast-enhancing agent to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) significantly improves image quality and allows radiologists who interpret MRI scans to pick up subtle anatomic details and abnormalities that might otherwise ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

India experts find traces of lead, nickel in patients' blood

Indian health officials have found traces of nickel and lead in a few blood samples taken from hundreds of patients who have been hospitalized by a mysterious illness in a southern state, officials said.

Neuroscience

Stereotypes prejudice our musical tastes

Music prompts strong emotional responses. But it turns out it's not just the sound, or even the lyrics, that control the emotions we experience.

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Heavy metal (chemistry)

A heavy metal is a member of an ill-defined subset of elements that exhibit metallic properties, which would mainly include the transition metals, some metalloids, lanthanides, and actinides. Many different definitions have been proposed—some based on density, some on atomic number or atomic weight, and some on chemical properties or toxicity. The term heavy metal has been called "meaningless and misleading" in an IUPAC technical report due to the contradictory definitions and its lack of a "coherent scientific basis". There is an alternative term toxic metal, for which no consensus of exact definition exists either. As discussed below, depending on context, heavy metal can include elements lighter than carbon and can exclude some of the heaviest metals. Heavy metals occur naturally in the ecosystem with large variations in concentration. Nowadays anthropogenic sources of heavy metals, i.e. pollution, have been introduced to the ecosystem. Waste derived fuels are especially prone to contain heavy metals so they should be a central concern in a consideration of their use.

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