Health

Helmet churn adds to challenges of e-scooter disruption

You're smiling as your e-scooter whispers along the riverside path. Without the helmet, the wind can blow through your hair – and it looks good! You hear a shout, "Pull over!", and turn to see police heading towards you ...

Health

UAlberta expert dispels 5 persistent myths about helmet use

Helmets would be required by law for all Albertans using any equipment that moves at significant velocity—regardless of age—in an ideal world, contends Don Voaklander, director of the Injury Prevention Centre in the University ...

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Helmet

A helmet is a form of protective gear worn on the head to protect it from injuries.

Ceremonial or symbolic helmets (e.g., English policeman's helmet) without protective function are sometimes used. The oldest known use of helmets was by Assyrian soldiers in 900BC, who wore thick leather or bronze helmets to protect the head from blunt object and sword blows and arrow strikes in combat. Soldiers still wear helmets, now often made from lightweight plastic materials.

In civilian life, helmets are used for recreational activities and sports (e.g., jockeys in horse racing, American football, ice hockey, cricket, baseball, and rock climbing); dangerous work activities (e.g., construction, mining, riot police); and transportation (e.g., Motorcycle helmets and bicycle helmets). Since the 1990s, most helmets are made from resin or plastic, which may be reinforced with fibers such as aramids.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA