Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New device for assisting accurate hemodialysis catheter placement

Researchers at Okayama University report in The Journal of Vascular Access a supporting device for accurately placing hemodialysis catheters on kidney patients. The device was successfully used on a group of 10 patients ...

Medications

Opioids may carry unique risks for patients on hemodialysis

A new analysis indicates that opioid pain medications may not be as safe for hemodialysis patients as recommendations suggest, and therefore, their use should be limited when possible. The analysis appears in an upcoming ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Depression is under-treated in patients receiving chronic dialysis

Many patients with kidney failure who are receiving chronic hemodialysis have depressive symptoms but do not wish to receive aggressive treatment to alleviate them, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the ...

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Hemodialysis

In medicine, hemodialysis (also haemodialysis) is a method for removing waste products such as creatinine and urea, as well as free water from the blood when the kidneys are in renal failure. Hemodialysis is one of three renal replacement therapies (the other two being renal transplant; peritoneal dialysis).

Hemodialysis can be an outpatient or inpatient therapy. Routine hemodialysis is conducted in a dialysis outpatient facility, either a purpose built room in a hospital or a dedicated, stand alone clinic. Less frequently hemodialysis is done at home. Dialysis treatments in a clinic are initiated and managed by specialized staff made up of nurses and technicians; dialysis treatments at home can be self initiated and managed or done jointly with the assistance of a trained helper who is usually a family member.

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