Diabetes

Diabetic-level glucose spikes seen in healthy people, study finds

A device that keeps extra-close tabs on the ups and downs of blood glucose levels reveals that most people see only a partial picture of the sugar circulating in their blood, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford ...

Neuroscience

Researchers uncover the source of diabetic nerve pain

A new King's College London study reveals the molecular basis of chronic nerve pain in diabetes. The findings in mice, published today in Science Translational Medicine, could one day lead to treatments which target the source ...

Diabetes

Designing better drugs to treat type 2 diabetes

Research led by the University of Adelaide is paving the way for safer and more effective drugs to treat type 2 diabetes, reducing side effects and the need for insulin injections.

Medical research

Your muscles can 'taste' sugar, research finds

It's obvious that the taste buds on the tongue can detect sugar. And after a meal, beta cells in the pancreas sense rising blood glucose and release the hormone insulin—which helps the sugar enter cells, where it can be ...

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Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia, hyperglycaemia, or high blood sugar is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood glucose level of 10+ mmol/L (180 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until later numbers like 15-20+ mmol/L (270-360 mg/dl)or 15.2-32.6 mmol/L. However, chronic levels exceeding 125 mg/dl can produce organ damage.

The origin of the term is Greek: hyper-, meaning excessive; -glyc-, meaning sweet; and -emia, meaning "of the blood".

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA