News tagged with high blood pressure

Related topics: blood pressure · heart disease · hypertension · heart attack · heart failure

Weight loss after obesity surgery may reverse eye damage

Early eye damage caused by obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes can potentially be reversed by obesity surgery, concludes a study presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes ...

Sep 13, 2017
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​Eating well in the food desert

We all know veggies keep us healthy. But for a lot of kids in regional and remote WA, it can be tricky to fill their diet with fresh, affordable food.

Sep 12, 2017
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Hurricane-battered Caribbean now faces health peril

Caribbean islands battered by Hurricane Irma now face a mighty task: preventing the rampant spread of disease as hospitals and clinics struggle to function and microbe-spreading mosquitoes and rats multiply.

Sep 07, 2017
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New device for testing heart health

UConn researchers from the Department of Mechanical Engineering have developed a device that tests an important indicator of heart health that is often ignored – blood viscosity.

Sep 06, 2017
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Hypertension

Hypertension, also referred to as high blood pressure, HTN or HPN, is a medical condition in which the blood pressure is chronically elevated. In current usage, the word "hypertension" without a qualifier normally refers to systemic, arterial hypertension.

Hypertension can be classified as either essential (primary) or secondary. Essential hypertension indicates that no specific medical cause can be found to explain a patient's condition. About 90-95% of hypertension is essential hypertension. Secondary hypertension indicates that the high blood pressure is a result of (i.e., secondary to) another condition, such as kidney disease or tumours (adrenal adenoma or pheochromocytoma).

Persistent hypertension is one of the risk factors for strokes, heart attacks, heart failure and arterial aneurysm, and is a leading cause of chronic renal failure. Even moderate elevation of arterial blood pressure leads to shortened life expectancy. At severely high pressures, defined as mean arterial pressures 50% or more above average, a person can expect to live no more than a few years unless appropriately treated. Beginning at a systolic pressure (which is peak pressure in the arteries, which occurs near the end of the cardiac cycle when the ventricles are contracting) of 115 mmHg and diastolic pressure (which is minimum pressure in the arteries, which occurs near the beginning of the cardiac cycle when the ventricles are filled with blood) of 75 mmHg (commonly written as 115/75 mmHg), cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk doubles for each increment of 20/10 mmHg.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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