Surgery

Getting a hip replacement? Choice of hospital can be crucial

(HealthDay)—The COVID-19 pandemic has shown a spotlight on disparities in the U.S. health care system. But the issues are longstanding, and—as one large study illustrates—extend into a common elective surgery.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Oxytocin can help prevent osteoporosis

Oxytocin, produced by the hypothalamus and sometimes known as the "love hormone" for its involvement in pair bonding and orgasm, can be a strong ally in the control and prevention of osteoporosis, according to a study by ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Repeat bone density tests might not be needed, study finds

(HealthDay)—Bone density tests are often touted as a way to predict the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women, but a new study casts doubt on the value of repeating this commonly used test.

page 1 from 68

Hip

In vertebrate anatomy, hip (or "coxa" in medical terminology) refer to either an anatomical region or a joint.

The hip region is located lateral to the gluteal region (i.e. the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the femur, or "thigh bone". In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone which forms part of the hip region.

The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulofemoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static (e.g. standing) and dynamic (e.g. walking or running) postures. The hip joints are the most important part in retaining balance. The pelvic inclination angle, which is the single most important element of human body posture, is adjusted at the hips.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA