Obstetrics & gynaecology

Madagascar trial: How a simple pregnancy test can change lives

Not having access to affordable pregnancy tests profoundly affects women's lives. Without access to these tests, women are not able to confirm if they are pregnant. This leads to delays in getting prenatal care services.

Health

ACOG recommends expanding OTC contraception access

In a Committee Opinion published in the October issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) presents recommendations for expanding over-the-counter access to hormonal ...

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Hormone

Hormones (from Greek ὁρμή - "impetus") are chemicals released by cells that affect cells in other parts of the body. Only a small amount of hormone is required to alter cell metabolism. It is essentially a chemical messenger that transports a signal from one cell to another. All multicellular organisms produce hormones; plant hormones are also called phytohormones. Hormones in animals are often transported in the blood. Cells respond to a hormone when they express a specific receptor for that hormone. The hormone binds to the receptor protein, resulting in the activation of a signal transduction mechanism that ultimately leads to cell type-specific responses.

Endocrine hormone molecules are secreted (released) directly into the bloodstream, while exocrine hormones (or ectohormones) are secreted directly into a duct, and from the duct they either flow into the bloodstream or they flow from cell to cell by diffusion in a process known as paracrine signalling.

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