HIV & AIDS

Fury at HIV data leak in conservative Singapore

Rico has lived with HIV for almost a decade, confiding in only a small number of people in socially conservative Singapore, fearful of the reaction. Last month, he got a phone call saying information about his condition had ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

In decision-making, it might be worth trusting your gut

Turns out the trope is true: You should trust your gut—as long as you're an expert. So says a new study from researchers at Rice University, George Mason University and Boston College.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Number-crunching could lead to unethical choices, study shows

Calculating the pros and cons of a potential decision is a way of decision-making. But repeated engagement with numbers-focused calculations, especially those involving money, can have unintended negative consequences, including ...

Health

Care for caregivers

(HealthDay)—Many of us will care for a parent at some point in our lives. If you're shopping or cooking for Mom or taking Dad to doctor visits, you're already a caregiver.

Psychology & Psychiatry

In negotiations, two jerks are better than one

Negotiations work best when both sides have matching personality traits-even if they're both disagreeable-according to research from the University of Georgia Terry College of Business.

Health

ILR survey finds HR pros value disability focus

(Medical Xpress) -- Disability-focused employee networks are key to retaining and advancing workers with disabilities, according to ILR School research released with the Society for Human Resource Management June 7. Such ...

Health

Workplace workouts... and why they work

(HealthDay)—Workplace wellness programs are great ways to get in shape, but what if your employer doesn't offer one? Here's how to get the (exercise) ball rolling.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study suggests fast food cues hurt ability to savor experience

Want to be able to smell the roses? You might consider buying into a neighbourhood where there are more sit-down restaurants than fast-food outlets, suggests a new paper from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

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