Surgery

Virus found in pig heart used in human transplant

Researchers trying to learn what killed the first person to receive a heart transplant from a pig have discovered the organ harbored an animal virus but cannot yet say if it played any role in the man's death.

Medical research

It takes a heart to make a better lung

Interactions between the developing heart and lungs are essential for proper growth and maturation; however, much is still unknown about the co-development of these critical organs. To provide fresh insight, a team of collaborators ...

Medical research

Scientists illuminate mechanism of common drug target

Roughly a third of all drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration target a large family of biomolecules, known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), whose job is to trigger cellular responses to extracellular ...

Neuroscience

Atherosclerotic plaques 'talk' with the brain

A new study shows the existence of a connection between atherosclerotic plaques and the central nervous system. This previously unknown "circuit" involves three systemically acting tissues, the immune system, the nervous ...

Biomedical technology

Plug-and-play organ-on-a-chip can be customized to the patient

Engineered tissues have become a critical component for modeling diseases and testing the efficacy and safety of drugs in a human context. A major challenge for researchers has been how to model body functions and systemic ...

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Human heart

The human heart provides a continuous blood circulation through the cardiac cycle and is one of the most vital organs in the human body. It is divided into four chambers: the two upper chambers are called the left and right atria and two lower chambers are called the right and left ventricles. Normally the right ventricle pumps the same blood amount into the lungs with each bit that the left ventricle pumps out. Physicians commonly refer to the right atrium and right ventricle together as the right heart and to the left atrium and ventricle as the left heart.

The electric energy that stimulates the heart occurs in the sinoatrial node, which produces a definite potential and then discharges, sending an impulse across the atria. The Purkinje fibers transmit the electric charge to the myocardium while the cells of the atrial walls transmit it from cell to cell, making the atrial syncytium.

The human heart and its disorders (cardiopathies) are studied primarily by cardiology.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA