Psychology & Psychiatry

Funny people are more intelligent than unfunny peers

Albert Einstein attributed his brilliant mind to having a child-like sense of humour. Indeed, a number of studies have found an association between humour and intelligence.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Researchers explore the purpose of offensive humour

Some people believe that offensive humour such as sexist or racist jokes can help break down barriers and challenge prejudice. Others simply find it appalling. The topic is clearly sensitive and often leads to discussions ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Sexist and anti-gay jokes: It's all about men feeling threatened

Why do some men crack sexist and anti-gay jokes or find them funny, while others do not? According to Emma O'Connor of the Western Carolina University in the US, such disparaging jokes are a way for some men to reaffirm their ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Changes in humour may be an early sign of dementia

Researchers at University College London (UCL) have revealed that a change in sense of humour could be an early sign of dementia. The findings could help improve dementia diagnosis, by highlighting changes not commonly thought ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Before they can speak, babies make friends: study

Babies still too small to speak know how to make jokes and form friendships, say researchers at an Australian university who have spent two years filming the behaviour of young children.

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