Medical research

Gut microbe battles obesity

(Medical Xpress)—Akkermansia muciniphila is one of the many microbes that live in our intestines. This bacterium, which feeds on the intestine's mucus lining, comprises between 3 and 5 percent of the gut microbes of healthy ...

Diabetes

Maternal hyperglycemia not linked to obesity in offspring

(HealthDay)—Maternal hyperglycemia seems not to be a risk factor for obesity in offspring aged 5 to 7 years after adjustment for maternal body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online June 19 in Diabetes ...

Diabetes

Glucose levels linked to cardiac surgery outcomes

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing cardiac surgery, hyperglycemia is associated with worse outcomes for patients without diabetes, but with better outcomes for patients with insulin-treated diabetes, according to a study ...

Diabetes

Metformin, sitagliptin prolong normoglycemia remission in DKA

(HealthDay)—For patients with new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and severe hyperglycemia, metformin and sitagliptin treatment after normoglycemia remission correlate with increased relapse-free survival and prolonged ...

Diabetes

Amino acid levels linked to type 2 diabetes risk

(HealthDay) -- Levels of some amino acids are associated with glycemia and insulin resistance and predict the development of type 2 diabetes in men, according to a study published online May 2 in Diabetes.

Diabetes

Sleep duration, efficiency linked to inpatient hyperglycemia

(HealthDay)—For hospitalized patients, additional sleep and increased sleep efficiency correlate with lower odds of hyperglycemia and impaired fasting glucose, according to research published online Nov. 30 in Diabetes ...

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Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia or Hyperglycæmia, or high blood sugar, is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a glucose level higher than 13.5mmol/l (243mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15-20 mmol/l (270-360 mg/dl). However, chronic levels exceeding 7 mmol/l (125 mg/dl) can produce organ damage.

The origin of the term is Greek: hyper-, meaning excessive; -glyc-, meaning sweet; and -emia, meaning "of the blood".

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA