Diabetes

New continuous glucose monitor may cut hypoglycemia in T1DM

(HealthDay)—Intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) results in higher treatment satisfaction among adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Dec. 24 in Diabetes Care.

Diabetes

First-ever quality measures aim to reduce diabetes complications

The Endocrine Society and Avalere Health introduced the first-ever quality measures to help healthcare providers assess how well they identify and care for older adults at greater risk of hypoglycemia—low blood sugar that ...

Diabetes

Glycemic control worse than thought in adults with T1DM

(HealthDay)—For adults with type 1 diabetes, glycemic control may be worse than previously thought, and rates of all complications increase with increasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), according to a study published online Sept. ...

Diabetes

Most diabetes phone apps lack education, support functions

(HealthDay)—Most diabetes apps miss opportunities to improve care and health outcomes by not providing real-time decision support or situation-specific education on blood glucose self-management, according to a research ...

Diabetes

New hope for preventing dangerous diabetes complication

People with diabetes who use insulin to control their blood sugar can experience a dangerous condition called hypoglycemia when blood sugar levels fall too low. New insights into a recently discovered protein called neuronostatin ...

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Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia or hypoglycaemia is the medical term for a state produced by a lower than normal level of blood glucose. The term literally means "under-sweet blood" (Gr. hypo-, glykys, haima).

Hypoglycemia can produce a variety of symptoms and effects but the principal problems arise from an inadequate supply of glucose as fuel to the brain, resulting in impairment of function (neuroglycopenia). Effects can range from vaguely "feeling bad" to seizures, unconsciousness, and (rarely) permanent brain damage or death.

The most common forms of moderate and severe hypoglycemia occur as a complication of treatment of diabetes mellitus with insulin or oral medications. Hypoglycemia is less common in non-diabetic persons, but can occur at any age, from many causes. Among the causes are excessive insulin produced in the body, inborn errors of carbohydrate, fat, amino acid or organic acid metabolism, medications and poisons, alcohol, hormone deficiencies, certain tumors, prolonged starvation, and alterations of metabolism associated with infection or failures of various organ systems.

Hypoglycemia is treated rapidly by restoring the blood glucose level to normal by the ingestion or administration of dextrose or carbohydrate foods quickly digestible to glucose. In some circumstances it is treated by injection or infusion of glucagon. Prolonged or recurrent hypoglyemia may be prevented by reversing or removing the underlying cause, by increasing the frequency of meals, with medications like diazoxide, octreotide, or glucocorticoids, or even by surgical removal of much of the pancreas.

The level of blood glucose low enough to define hypoglycemia may be different for different people, in different circumstances, and for different purposes, and occasionally has been a matter of controversy. Most healthy adults maintain fasting glucose levels above 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L), and develop symptoms of hypoglycemia when the glucose falls below 55 mg/dL (3 mmol/L).

It can sometimes be difficult to determine whether a person's symptoms are due to hypoglycemia. Endocrinologists (physicians with expertise in disorders of glucose metabolism) typically consider the criteria referred to as Whipple's triad as conclusive evidence that an individual's symptoms can be attributed to hypoglycemia instead of to some other cause:

Hypoglycemia (alternative medicine) is also a term in popular culture and alternative medicine for a common, often self-diagnosed condition characterized by shakiness and altered mood and thinking, but without measured low glucose or risk of severe harm. It is treated by changing eating patterns.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA